Matt Williams

The career was spectacular. Matt Williams was a five-time All-Star, a Gold Glove infielder, a home run champion. But, oh, what might have been. “If Matt Williams played out injury-free,” said the late Al Rosen, who as Giants general manager picked Williams third...
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Jeff Kent

Jeff Kent’s roots in the bay area are double-tiered. He played on two teams that went to the World Series – the giants in 2002 and Cal in 1988 – and made an impact on both as a power-hitting middle infielder. To acquire Kent, the giants traded popular Matt Williams,...
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Barry Bonds

Even before he came to the Giants, Barry Bonds had extensive ties to the Bay Area. He went to schools on the peninsula through high school, his father, Bobby Bonds, and godfather, Willie Mays, both played for the Giants. His cousin, Reggie Jackson, played for the A’s....
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Dusty Baker

There have been great players in baseball, and superior managers, but few excelled at both like Dusty Baker. He broke into the big leagues as a disciple of Hank Aaron in Atlanta, hitting .321 in his first full season in 1972. Three years later he was traded to Los...
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Tony La Russa

Tony La Russa managed the Chicago White Sox, Oakland Athletics and the St. Louis Cardinals to six League Championships and three World Series wins. Among all major league managers, he ranks third in total wins, behind Connie Mack and John McGraw. The cornerstone for...
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Dave Righetti

Dave Righetti ranked among baseball's top closers in the 1980s and cemented his legacy in the game as a pitching coach. Righetti initially established himself as a starting pitcher for the New York Yankees. He was elected American League Rookie of the Year in 1981,...
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Bert Campaneris

Bert Campaneris is the Cuban-born shortstop and speedy leadoff hitter for the Oakland Athletics teams that won consecutive World Series Championships from 1972 through 1974, the only team other than the Yankees to win that many in a row. Campaneris led the American...
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Gaylord Perry

Gaylord Perry began his distinguished 22 year major league career with the San Francisco Giants in 1962. Before the end of that decade, he and BASHOF Enshrinee Juan Marichal had formed one of the most potent one-two pitching combinations of the time. In 1966, Perry...
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Will Clark

Will Clark earned his nickname, “Will the Thrill”, in his first major league at-bat with the San Francisco Giants, slugging a home run off baseball Hall of Famer Nolan Ryan on April 8, 1986.  Blessed with an elegant batting stroke, he hit .308 with 35 homers in his...
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Jerry Coleman

Jerry Coleman signed with the New York Yankees after graduation from San Francisco’s Lowell High School in 1942, but served instead as a decorated Marine Corps fighter pilot in World War II.  He finally joined the Yankees in 1949 after several seasons in the...
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Dennis Eckersley

Born in Oakland, Dennis Eckersley had a 24-year major league career as a right-hand starter and reliever. He started his major league career with Cleveland in 1975, played with Boston from 1978 to 1984, and was traded in 1984 to the Chicago Cubs. He joined the Oakland...
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Dave Stewart

Right-hander Dave Stewart was at his peak with the Oakland A's, a four-time 20-game winner. His career spanned 15 years on five clubs, (Dodgers, Rangers, Phils, A's, Blue Jays) with a record of 168-129 and a 3.95 ERA. A pressure pitcher, he excelled in league...
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Vada Pinson

In his own workmanlike, dedicated fashion, speedy outfielder Vada Pinson played 18 seasons of major league baseball and built an imposing record— a .286 lifetime batting average and, just as important in his worth to his teams, a .981 fielding average. Pinson was one...
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Vida Blue

Vida Blue began his career in 1971 with the Oakland A’s and, as a rookie, won the Cy Young and MVP Awards with a 24-8 record and 1.82 ERA. He started in the All-Star Game that year with credit for the American League’s win. In 1973, he won 20 games; in 1975, 22. In...
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Curt Flood

As a youngster, Curt Flood starred on the baseball fields of Oakland, Alameda and San Francisco. He was originally signed by Cincinnati and traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1957. He earned seven Gold Glove Awards from 1963-1969 and batted .300 or better in six...
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Eddie Joost

A native of San Francisco, Eddie Joost starred in baseball at Mission High School, was signed by the Mission Reds of the Pacific Coast League in 1933 and sold to the Cincinnati Redlegs in 1936. He played in the major leagues 17 seasons and held the MLB record of 225...
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Bill Rigney

A native of Alameda, where he starred for the family-sponsored, semi-pro Rigney Tile Nine, Bill Rigney later played for the Pacific Coast League Oakland Oaks. He joined the New York Giants in 1946, where he played as an infielder for eight years, with a fielding...
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Dolph Camilli

Born in San Francisco, Dolph Camilli was a left-handed first baseman with the Cubs, Phillies, Dodgers and Red Sox. His career spanned 12 major league seasons: 1933-45. He had more than 20 home runs in 8 consecutive seasons and 5 times drove in more than 100 runs....
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Rollie Fingers

Rollie Fingers joined the Oakland A’s in 1968 and was World Series MVP in 1974 and the AL’s MVP in 1981. He received the Cy Young Award in 1981 and had 341 saves in the regular season and six in three World Series with the Oakland A’s (1972, 1973, 1974). Fingers was...
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Reggie Jackson

Reggie Jackson joined the Kansas City A’s in 1967 and moved with A’s to Oakland in 1968. He played 21 years and had 581 HRs, with the A’s, Orioles, Yankees and Angels. He was the AL’s MVP in 1973 and World Series MVP in both 1973 and 1977. The all-time slugging leader...
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Dick Bartell

Dick Bartell was raised in Alameda and completed 18 major league seasons with the Pirates, Phillies, Giants, Cubs and Tigers. He was starting shortstop for the NL in the first All-Star Game, in 1933, while with Phillies. He played in three World Series with the Giants...
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Dominic DiMaggio

Born in San Francisco, where he played at Galileo High School, Dominic DiMaggio was signed by the Seals in 1937. He joined the Boston Red Sox in 1940, where he played 11 seasons, which were interrupted by three years of military service. He was an outstanding...
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Billy Martin

Billy Martin was born and raised in Berkeley. After graduating from Berkeley High, he signed with the Oakland Oaks in 1946. In 1950, he was sold to the New York Yankees, where in six seasons, he played in five World Series, batting .333. He retired after 11 seasons...
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Joe Morgan

Raised in Oakland, where he attended Castlemont High School, Joe Morgan attended Merritt College for one year. He joined Houston in 1961. After playing in the minor leagues, he became a regular in 1965. He was traded to Cincinnati in 1972 ,where he won five Gold...
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Orlando Cepeda

Orlando Cepeda joined the San Francisco Giants as a rookie in 1958 and was selected to the All-Rookie Team. He batted .307 in his seven seasons as a Giant and led the NL in home runs (46) and RBIs (142) in 1961. Selected to the 1963 All-Star Team, he played 17 years...
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Jim “Catfish” Hunter

Catfish Hunter came to Oakland in 1968 with the Kansas City A’s. In seven seasons with the Oakland A’s, he played in three World Series. His World Series record was 4-0, with one save. With the A’s, he bettered 20 wins five times, topped by 25-12 in 1974 and 23-14 in...
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Anthony M. Lazzeri

Born in San Francisco in 1906, Anthony Lazzeri developed his baseball skills at Jackson Playground in the Potrero District. He joined the New York Yankees in 1926, after hitting 60 home runs for the Salt Lake City Bees. A premier fielder as well as a hitter, he played...
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Wilver “Willie” Dornell Stargell

A multi-sport star at Alameda’s Encinal High School, Willie Stargell was the inspirational leader of the Pittsburgh Pirates and its captain. All of his 21 seasons were with the Pirates, where he crushed 475 home runs, twice leading the NL, with 48 in 1971 and with 44...
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Sam Chapman

As a star member of the University of California "Thunder Teams" in 1935, 1936 and 1937, Sam Chapman was a star offensive and defensive halfback, He was named to six All-American teams in 1937. He also was a power hitter and swift fielder for the UC baseball team. His...
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Willie “Stretch” McCovey

The San Francisco Giants’ first baseman from 1959-73 and 1977-80, Willie McCovey established a career record of 521 home runs. This places him in the all-time top ten. Nicknamed "Stretch" for his ability to catch wide and high throws to first base, he also was named...
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Harry Heilmann

A native San Franciscan, Harry Heilmann attended Sacred Heart High School, and, at the age of 18, joined the Detroit Tigers. A star from the start, he played in the major leagues 13 seasons with time out for military service in World War I. He led the majors in...
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Jack “Jackie” Eugene Jensen

University of California, 1946-48 Oakland Oaks, 1949 NY Yankees, 1950-52 Washington Senators, 1952-53 Boston Red Sox, 1954-61 Football and baseball great Jackie Jensen was born in San Francisco in 1927. An All-American halfback at the University of California,...
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Frank Robinson

Cincinnati Reds, 1956-65 Baltimore Orioles, 1966-71 Los Angeles Dodgers, 1973-74 Cleveland Indians, 1974-76 Raised in Oakland, Frank Robinson was a baseball star at McClymonds High School before joining the Cincinnati Reds, where he was selected National League Rookie...
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Joseph “Joe” Edward Cronin

Pittsburgh Pirates, 1926-27 Washington Senators, 1928-34 Boston Red Sox, 1935-45 A baseball Hall of Famer, Joe Cronin's major league career spanned 20 years. A perennial all-star, he was named Most Valuable Player in the American League in 1930, at age 24, with a...
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Ernest “Ernie” Natali Lombardi

Oakland Oaks, 1926 Brooklyn Dodgers, 1931 Cincinnati Redlegs, 1932-41 Boston Braves, 1942 NY Giants, 1943-47 Born and raised in Oakland and one of the most popular players baseball has known, Ernie Lombardi won the 1938 batting title with a .342 average and most...
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Juan Antonio Sanchez Marichal

Tacoma, 1960 San Francisco Giants, 1960-1973 Boston Red Sox, 1974 Los Angeles Dodgers, 1975 An outstanding pitcher, Juan Marichal compiled a 243-142-lifetime record in 16 big league seasons. On June 15, 1963, he pitched a 1-0 no-hitter at Candlestick Park against the...
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Vernon “Lefty” Louis Gomez

Salt Lake City Bees, 1928 San Francisco Seals, 1929 New York Yankees, 1930-42 Boston Braves-Washington Senators, 1943 Discovered on the sand lots of Richmond High School, 17-year-old "Lefty" Gomez’s next stop was the San Francisco Seals. His pitching debut there was a...
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Francis “Lefty” Joseph O’Doul

Seals, Yankees, Red Sox, Giants, Phillies & Dodgers, 1918-34 "Lefty" O’Doul and San Francisco are synonymous. He was born here, raised here, and after 73 years, he died here. O’Doul won two major league batting championships, managed four Pacific Coast League...
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Joseph “Joe” Paul DiMaggio

One of the greatest outfielders of modern baseball, Joe DiMaggio, the "Yankee Clipper," began his career with the San Francisco Seals in 1932. Hitting safely in 61 consecutive games, which set a Pacific Coast record, he joined New York Yankees in 1936. In 1941, he set...
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Willie Howard Mays, Jr.

New York/ San Francisco Giants, 1951-72 Outstanding outfielder for the New York Giants (which in 1958, became the San Francisco Giants), Willie Mays was named Rookie of the Year in 1951 and, for over 20 years, drew admiration for his hitting, fielding, throwing and...
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Bill Cartwright

A three-time All-American and five-time NBA champion, Bill Cartwright’s roots can be traced back to a farming community outside of Sacramento, where he and his six sisters spent summer days chopping sugar beets and hoeing weeds under the sweltering sun.  A native of...
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Mitch Richmond

He was the subtle superstar, a basketball player who did what was needed by his team—whether the U.S. Olympic squad, the Golden State Warriors or the Sacramento Kings—rather than what would get him individual acclaim. He wasn’t always overlooked, but it seemed...
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Kevin Johnson

As a point guard at Cal in the mid-1980s, Kevin Johnson helped end the school’s 26-year postseason drought and was twice named First-Team All Pac-10. Johnson left the school as the team’s all-time leader in points, assists and steals. Cal retired his jersey. Drafted...
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Jennifer Azzi

As Stanford’s first All American woman basketball player, Jennifer Azzi led the Cardinal to the school’s first NCAA Women’s Championship in 1990 and received the coveted Naismith Trophy as the nation’s top collegiate woman player that year.  She was also the Most...
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Chris Mullin

Chris Mullin played 13 of his 16 NBA seasons with the Golden State Warriors. A five-time All Star, he averaged better than 25 points per game for five consecutive seasons (1988-89 through 1992-93), a feat equaled in franchise history only by Wilt Chamberlain. He set...
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Tom Meschery

Tom Meschery is an All-American success story. Born in China in 1938, he came to the U.S. with his parents after WW II. He was an All-American at Lowell High School, San Francisco, and St. Mary's College, Moraga, CA, and an NBA Star for ten seasons, noted as one of...
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Phil Woolpert

Phil Woolpert was the basketball coach at University of San Francisco and came to national attention when he led his great 1955 and 1956 teams to NCAA titles. But perhaps more significant was his coaching of the '57 team, without superstars Bill Russell and Casey...
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Fred Scolari

A native San Franciscan, Fred Scolari joined the Washington Capitols in 1946. He was 5 feet 10 1/2 inches, a gifted defensive man with an unorthodox off-the-hip shot that helped the Capitols to three playoffs in four seasons. Later he played for Baltimore, Fort Wayne...
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George Yardley

George Yardley was called "The Scoring Machine" when he broke the legendary Hank Luisetti’s Stanford record. He led the San Francisco Stewart’s Chevrolet team to the National AAU Championship in 1951. During the 1957-58 season, he became the first player to score...
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Don Barksdale

After starring at a Berkeley playground, Don Barksdale was recruited to Marin JC and then to UCLA, where he was an All-American basketball player. He earned gold medals with the 1948 U.S. Olympic Team and in the Pan American Games of 1951. In that year, the...
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Al Attles

With the Warriors for 33 seasons, Al Attles played for 11 years and served as head coach for 14 years and general manager for 3 years. Since 1986, he has been the vice president and a consultant to the team. Nicknamed "The Destroyer," he played in 774 NBA games as...
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Jim Pollard

Born in Oakland in 1922, Jim Pollard starred at Oakland Tech High School. As a member of Stanford’s 1942 NCAA Championship Team, he won high scoring honors and was named to the All-Tournament Team. He played eight NBA seasons (1948-1955) with the Minneapolis Lakers,...
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Rick Barry

Rick Barry was selected Rookie of the Year after joining the Golden State Warriors for the 1966-67 season. His scoring average as a rookie was 25.7. The next year, his scoring average rose to 35.6, the best in the NBA. He was selected to the NBA All-Star Team eight...
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Nate Thurmond

Selected by the Golden State Warriors as their first draft choice for the 1963-64 season, Nate Thurmond completed 11 seasons. He was considered by many as the best rebounder in the game. An excellent scorer, he had five consecutive seasons averaging over 20 points per...
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K.C. Jones

A graduate of San Francisco’s Commerce High School, K.C. Jones was a member of the 1954-5 and 1955-6 University of San Francisco NCAA basketball champions. K.C. Jones is credited with revolutionizing the concept of defense in college basketball. Selected to the...
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Peter “Pete” Newell

Coach Pete Newell led the University of San Francisco to the NIT title in 1949. Ten years later, he led the University of California at Berkeley to the NCAA Championship. And under his leadership, the United States Basketball Team won the 1960 Olympic Gold Medal....
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Angelo “Hank” Luisetti

Stanford University, 1935-38 Native San Franciscan and Galileo High School graduate Hank Luisetti revolutionized the game of basketball with his one-handed shot. Recognized as the greatest player in West Coast history, he led Stanford to three consecutive Pacific...
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William “Bill” Fenton Russell

University of San Francisco graduate Bill Russell led the Dons in the 1956 national championship and a string of 61 unbeaten games. Twice named All-American and 1956 College Player of the Year, he was key to the 1956 U.S. Olympic championship at Melbourne. He had an...
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Max Baer

Raised in Livermore, California, Max Baer began his boxing career in 1929, at age 20, in Oakland. He won his first twelve fights by knockouts. In 1933, wearing the Star of David on his trunks, he knocked out Max Schmeling, "the fighting pride of Nazi Germany," in the...
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James “Gentleman Jim” John Corbett

A boxing immortal, the late James J. Corbett won the heavyweight boxing title in 1892, when he knocked out the famed John L. Sullivan in New Orleans after 21 rounds. Known as "Gentleman Jim," San Francisco-born Corbett weighed 178 pounds to Sullivan’s 212. A...
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Brian Boitano

Brian Boitano, the only American man to win a gold medal at the 1988 Winter Olympics, forged a reputation as one of history’s most athletic figure skaters. At the age of eight, he took his first lessons in his hometown of Sunnyvale. He won numerous national...
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Kristi Yamaguchi

Kristi Yamaguchi is one of the most electrifying figure skaters in the modern era. As a junior she competed in both pairs and singles, winning both events (the doubles with Rudi Galindo) at the World Junior Championships in 1988. Concentrating on the singles after...
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Peggy Fleming Jenkins

Born in San Jose, Peggy Fleming won the first of five U.S. Figure Skating titles in 1964, at age 15. In 1968 , at age18, she won the U.S. title at the Berkeley Ice Rink. Winner of three Figure Skating World Championships— in 1966, '67 and '68—she was the only U.S....
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Raymond Chester

Raymond Chester was selected in the first round of the 1970 NFL draft and became an instant star, winning NFL rookie of the year honors after catching 42 passes for 556 yards and seven touchdowns. He also formed a friendship with owner Al Davis which lasted until...
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Bob Ladouceur

Under Bob Ladouceur, the football records at De La Salle High School in Concord look made up or misprinted. In 34 seasons, his Spartans won 399 games, the most in California history, lost 25 and tied three for a winning percentage of 93.4%, the highest among any prep...
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Tim Brown

When the Raiders returned to their original home in Oakland in 1995, after 13 seasons in Los Angeles, they brought one superstar with them. His name was Tim Brown. In the wake of winning the Heisman Trophy at Notre Dame and being drafted in the first round by the...
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Brent Jones

Brent Jones spent his entire athletic career—prep, college and professional—in the Bay Area, going from Leland High in San Jose to Santa Clara University to the San Francisco 49ers. He was the thirrd tight end taken in the 1986 NFL draft by the Pittsburgh Steelers in...
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Tom Flores

Tom Flores is, along with Mike Ditka, one of only two people to win a Super Bowl as a player, an assistant coach and a head coach. Born in Sanger, California, Flores played quarterback for College of Pacific (now University of Pacific), which he attended on an...
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Gene Washington

After starring at Long Beach Poly, Gene Washington played under John Ralston at Stanford. He switched from quarterback to receiver after his sophomore year and led Stanford in receptions for his last two years, catching 71 passes for 1117 yards as a senior, with Jim...
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Dwight Clark

Dwight Clark is best known for “The Catch," a touchdown pass from Joe Montana that beat the Dallas Cowboys in the 1982 NFC Championship Game. In his nine year career with the 49ers, he caught 506 passes for 6,750 yards and 48 touchdowns. He was only the 20th receiver...
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George Seifert

Over an eight year period as the first San Francisco native to coach the 49ers, George Seifert compiled what was at the time the best winning percentage in NFL history (.755). Seifert, who attended high school across the street from Kezar Stadium, the 49ers’ first...
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R. C. Owens

R. C. Owens had a productive NFL career, but is best remembered for one play, the "Alley Oop," when he leaped high between defensive backs to catch this pass. The play was a natural for Owens, a college basketball player who led the nation with 27 rebounds a game one...
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Craig Morton

At the completion of his 1964 All America Season at Cal, Craig Morton held virtually every school record for passing. His then-record 36 touchdown passes, achieved in three seasons and in schedules shorter by one or two games, survived for 25 years after his...
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Dave Casper

Nicknamed “The Ghost” after the cartoon character, Dave Casper played seven seasons for the Oakland Raiders. He established himself as one of the NFL’s most dangerous receivers while playing tight end, a blocking position in most offenses. Although Casper was a fine...
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Roger Craig

Renowned for his high-knee-action running style, Roger Craig became the first player ever to score three touchdowns in the Super Bowl during the 49ers’ 38-16 win over the Miami Dolphins in XIX.  The next season (1985), he became the first player in NFL history to both...
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Ray Guy

Ray Guy was one of the greatest punters in NFL history. Coming from the University of Southern Mississippi, in 1973, he was the first pure punter ever selected in the first round of the NFL draft by the Oakland Raiders. Only once in his 14 years as a Raider did he...
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Burl Toler Sr.

Burt Toler was the rock-solid center and linebacker on the now justly celebrated University of San Francisco team of 1951, which finished undefeated, untied, and uninvited to a post-season bowl game, mainly because two of its great stars, Toler and Ollie Matson, were...
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Jerry Rice

Justifiably acclaimed as the greatest pass receiver in football history, Jerry Rice held at the time of his retirement twelve NFL regular season, seven post-season and nine Super Bowl records.  He left the game as the all-time leader in receptions (1549), receiving...
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Ted Hendricks

Ted Hendricks played nine seasons for the Raiders, revolutionizing the linebacker position in the 1970s and 1980s by operating both behind the line in run and pass coverage and as a pass rusher from what would ordinarily be a defensive end position. Unusually tall at...
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Dick Bass

Dick Bass became a Bay Area high school sports legend in the 1950s as a sensational running back at Vallejo High, scoring 37 touchdowns in nine games as a senior. He was no less sensational at the College of Pacific, recording a rare trifecta in 1959 when he led the...
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Steve Young

Steve Young finished a 13-year career with the 49ers as the NFL’s highest ranked career passer with a rating of 96.8. He was the league’s MVP in 1992 and 1994 and Super Bowl XXIX MVP after he tossed a Super Bowl record six touchdown passes in the Niners’ 49 to 26 win...
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Joe Kapp

Joe Kapp is the only quarterback to lead teams to the Rose Bowl, the Canadian Football League’s Grey Cup and the Super Bowl. He was the last quarterback to throw 7 touchdown passes in a single game (vs. the Baltimore Colts in 1969.) He was the leading passer and...
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Eddie LeBaron

Despite his diminutive stature – 5’7”, 165 pounds – Eddie LeBaron led College (now University) of Pacific to an undefeated season in 1949 and was named Most Valuable Player in the annual Shrine East-West All Star Game in San Francisco. Drafted in the tenth round by...
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John Elway

John Elway was a Stanford All-American quarterback from 1979-1982. Then, with the Denver Broncos, he created unmatched NFL records, with 148 wins, passed more than 3,000 yards, and rushed more than 200 yards in the same season for seven straight years. Elway also had...
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Lynn Swann

A graduate of Serra High School in San Mateo, Lynn starred as a wide receiver at the University of Southern California, where he was selected an All-American in 1973. He played his entire professional career of nine seasons with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Lynn appeared...
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David Wilcox

David Wilcox was enshrined in the year 2000 by the Pro Football Hall of Fame for his exceptional and ferocious outside linebacking with the San Francisco 49ers of 1964-1974. He missed only one game and was elected to the Pro Bowl seven times, and, in 1967, received...
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Willie Brown

Willie Brown played cornerback for the Oakland Raiders for 12 of his 16 playing years, from 1967-1978. He started for the Raiders in Super Bowl II and Super Bowl XI. A 75 yard interception return for a TD in Super Bowl XI was the highlight, but he still holds the pro...
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Ken (Snake) Stabler

Ken "Snake" Stabler was at the forefront of the Oakland Raiders glory years under Coach John Madden. In his 10 Raider years, the left-handed All-American quarterback from Alabama was named to the Pro Bowl five times ('73 to '77), passing for more than 200 yards 36...
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Billy Wilson

Billy Wilson is one of the San Francisco 49ers all-time greats. At Campbell High School, he was a 4-letter man, then starred at San Jose State. He played 10 years with the 49ers (1951-1960) as pass-catching end, compiling 5902 yards and 49 touchdowns in the short...
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Ronnie Lott

Heralded as an All-American at USC, Ronnie Lott proved his worth immediately as a 49er rookie in 1981. His statistics are not as numerous only because they do not catalogue the ferocity of his hundreds, maybe thousands, of tackles. He was at the forefront of the 49er...
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Joe Montana

Notre Dame alum Joe Montana is an all-time great quarterback who holds many 49er and NFL passing records. His career achievements include 2,929 completions for 35,142 yards (1979-1992), Super Bowl MVP in 1982, 1985, 1990, as well as NFL player of the year and...
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Gordy Soltau

All Big Ten at University of Minnesota in 1950, Gordy Soltau starred as a pass-catching end and kicker for the 49ers. In 1952 and 1953, he led the NFL in scoring. During his nine seasons as a 49er, he led the team in scoring with 644 points, 25 touchdowns, and 70...
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Art Shell

Art Shell is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. A tackle with the Oakland Raiders for 15 seasons (1968-82), he was a Pro Bowl selection eight times over three decades, All NFL three times and All Conference five times. Shell played in 207 league games and...
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Dan Fouts

Dan Fouts compiled an amazing record as a San Diego Chargers’ quarterback: 15 seasons, 3,297 passes for 43,040 yards, 254 TDs, 13 TDs rushing, six Pro Bowls, two NFL MVPs, and three All-Pro. He led the NFL in passing for four seasons and broke a record for 4,082 yards...
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John Ralston

John Ralston’s football career started in 1947 as a linebacker at the University of California, where he later became assistant coach. In 1959, he became head coach at Utah State and went to two bowl games. He became head coach at Stanford in 1969, coaching the team...
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Chuck Taylor

Chuck Taylor achieved All-American status as a guard when Stanford coach Clark Shaughnessy introduced the famed T-formation to the nation’s schools. The 1940 team went undefeated, and after military service and a 49er assistant post, Taylor continued his Stanford...
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John Henry Johnson

Stardom for John Henry Johnson ranged from Pittsburg, California, where he was a high school sensation to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where as a super running back, he earned NFL Hall of Fame enshrinement. His career moved from Berkeley’s St. Mary’s High School to...
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Gene Upshaw

Gene Upshaw joined the Oakland Raiders in 1967 from Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M) as the number-one draft choice. He and Art Shell, on the left side of the defensive line, were heralded as the best guard and tackle combination in the game. The path they...
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Edward P. “Slip” Madigan

A center at Notre Dame under Knute Rockne, Slip Madigan became a legend coaching St. Mary’s College football from 1921 to 1939. His flamboyant, charismatic nature combined with football savvy brought the small college into national prominence with a 116-45-12 record...
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Bill Walsh

A graduate of Hayward High School and San Jose State, Bill Walsh had a career that carried him from the head-coaching job at Fremont’s Washington High School to roles as assistant coach at the University of California, Stanford, the Oakland Raiders, the Cincinnati...
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Jim Plunkett

Jim Plunkett led Stanford to its 1970 Rose Bowl victory. A unanimous All-American and Heisman Trophy Winner, he was the first player selected in the 1971 NFL draft. The 1971 NFL Rookie of the Year with the New England Patriots, he was traded to 49ers in 1976. Plunkett...
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John Madden

John Madden played football and baseball at Jefferson High School in Daly City. A tackle at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, he was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles, but his career ended with injury in his first season. He coached at Hancock Junior College and San Diego...
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Bob St. Clair

Born and raised in San Francisco, Bob St. Clair starred at Polytechnic High School and the University of San Francisco. He played his final year at Tulsa University, then played for the San Francisco 49ers from 1953 to1964. He was the Len Eshmont award winner in 1963,...
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Fred Biletnikoff

Fred Biletnikoff joined the Oakland Raiders in 1965, after being selected All-American Flanker at Florida State in 1964. In 14 seasons with the Raiders, he was selected All-Pro 4 times. He gained 100 or more yards 21 times, led the NFL in receptions with 61 in 1971...
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Jimmy Johnson

Jimmy Johnson played his entire career with the 49ers, from 1961 to 1976. Prior to that, in1960, he was selected as a Track & Field All-American at UCLA. Elected All-Pro four times and to the Pro Bowl five times, he led the 49ers in career interceptions, with 47...
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George Blanda

As an Oakland Raider (1967-75), George Blanda set team records as the all-time scoring leader, with 863 points, and the single-season record, with 117 points. He was AFC Player of the Year in 1970 for his last minute heroics, which brought the Raiders the...
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John Brodie

Born in San Francisco, John Brodie was raised in the East Bay, where he starred in football, baseball and basketball at Oakland Tech. At Stanford, he was selected All-American in 1956 and named the most valuable player of the 1957 East-West Shrine Game. Selected as...
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Yelberton Abraham “Y.A.” Tittle

Yelberton Abraham Tittle began his ten-year career with the San Francisco 49ers in 1951. He was selected to play in the Pro Bowl six times, the first being in 1954. He led the NFL in passing in 1957, with a 63 percent completion average, and paced the 49ers to a...
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Lynn “Pappy” Waldorf

As head football coach at University of California from 1947-56, Pappy Waldorf revived the program and established a 67-32-4 record. His teams qualified for three consecutive Rose Bowls and set a 7-1-2 record against rival Stanford. After retiring from Cal, he joined...
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O.J. Simpson

While attending Galileo High, City College of San Francisco and USC, O.J. Simpson set records at each school for rushing. When he retired in 1979, after playing for the Buffalo Bills and the San Francisco 49ers, he was the second-leading NFL career rusher with 11,236...
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Jim Otto

A member of the original Oakland Raiders, Jim Otto was the team's staring center for 307 consecutive professional football games, which established the NFL record for most consecutive games with a club. Perennial team captain, he twice won the Raider’s Gorman Award as...
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Fletcher “Joe the Jet” Joe Perry

One of football’s greatest runners, Joe Perry was one of the National Football Leagues’ original 1,000 yard rushers in a 12 game season. Nicknamed "The Jet" because of his extraordinary quick start, he led the 49ers in rushing seven years in a row and eight out of...
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Gino Marchetti

A member of the University of San Francisco's undefeated 1951 team, Gino Marchetti was the New York Yankees' Number two draftee in 1952. He moved to Dallas in his rookie season, was with the Baltimore Colts from 1953 to 1964, and returned to that team for the 1966...
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Leo Nomellini

All-American in football at the University of Minnesota, Leo Nomellini was the first player selected by the San Francisco 49ers in the team’s original NFL draft. Named top defensive tackle of NFL’s first 50 years, he was elected to Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1969...
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Buck Shaw

Football’s famed Silver Fox and the San Francisco 49ers’ first head coach, Buck Shaw was an All-America tackle at Notre Dame in 1919, 1920 and 1921. He was head coach at theUniversity of Santa Clara from 1936 to 1942, where he led the Broncos to national prominence,...
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Glenn “Pop” S. Warner

Legendary football coach Glenn "Pop" Warner was one of the most innovative of the game’s early collegiate coaches. Warner coached the Carlisle Indians and that team’s superstar, Jim Thorpe. He went from Pittsburgh University to Stanford in 1924. As a sign of his...
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Ollie Genoa Matson

University of San Francisco, 1949-51 Chicago Cardinals, 1952, 54-58 Los Angeles Rams, 1959-62 Detroit Lions, 1963 A member of the 1952 Olympic team, Ollie Matson starred in football and track at San Francisco’s Washington High School, City College, and the University...
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Hugh “King” Edward McElhenny

University of Washington, 1949-1951 San Francisco 49ers, 1952-1960 Minnesota Vikings, 1961-62 NY Giants, 1963 Detroit Lions, 1964Football Hall of Famer Hugh McElhenny's career spanned thirteen seasons in the National Football League. He was elected to the Associated...
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Frank “Frankie” Culling Albert

Frankie Albert enjoys the distinction of being the first player signed by the San Francisco 49ers for competition in the All-American Football Conference. That 1946 event was preceded by Albert’s starring performance as quarterback for Stanford University. There the...
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Ernest “Ernie” A. Nevers

Stanford University, 1923-25 St. Louis Browns, 1925-26 Duluth Eskimos, 1926-28 Chicago Cardinals, 1929-31 The greatest fullback in Stanford history, Ernie Nevers earned the title "America’s all-time one-man team" for prowess in all aspects of football. An...
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Roger Maltbie

Roger Maltbie had two excellent careers in golf, the first as a player who won five PGA tour tournaments including in 1976 the Initial Memorial, the other as one of prime announcers for the NBC network. Born in Modesto, Maltbie grew up in San Jose and competed as an...
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George Archer

San Francisco native George Archer won 12 PGA Tour events and 19 tournaments on the Senior PGA Tour (now called the Champions Tour). Most memorably, Archer became the first Bay Area player to win the Masters, slipping his arms into the famous green jacket when he...
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Juli Simpson Inkster

Juli Simpson Inkster won 39 professional golf tournaments, including seven women’s majors. Twice she took the U.S. Open, in 1999 and again in 2002, when, at age 42, she became the second oldest woman ever to win the event. Inkster started her golf career in Santa...
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Frank “Sandy” Tatum

Frank “Sandy” Tatum won the NCAA Individual Golf Championship in 1942, but he made his biggest contributions to the game without a club in hand. Tatum, a longtime San Francisco lawyer, served on the Executive Committee of the United States Golf Association from...
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Tom Watson

Tom Watson starred for the 1968-71 Stanford University golf team and then turned pro. He won 34 times on the PGA tour, including the 1981 Masters and the 1982 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. He wasthe PGA Player of the Year six times. Watson's remarkable career includes...
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Johnny Miller

At age eight, Johnny Miller played his first Junior Golf Association of Northern California Golf Tournament at Lake Merced Golf Course. He has won the U.S. Open and British Open, plus 24 other PGA Tournaments. His record closing "63" captured the 1973 U.S. Open at...
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Tony Lema

Born in Oakland, Tony Lema had a meteoric golf career that ended in the fatal crash of a private plane in 1966. He was just 32 years old. From 1962-1966, he won 10 tour events, was second 11 times, and was third 4 times. He won the British Open in 1964 and was a...
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Ken Venturi

Ken Venturi played his first round of golf at Harding Park at the age of 12. By the time he was 18, he had won the San Francisco City Championship. After graduating from Lincoln High in 1949, Venturi attended San Jose State College. He played on the golf team and...
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Owen Nolan

Owen Nolan, one of the National Hockey League’s purest power forwards, enjoyed his best NHL seasons as a member of the San Jose Sharks. Nolan was the first overall selection in the 1990 NHL draft by the Quebec Nordiques, where he would play his first five NHL seasons...
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Russell Baze

There has never been a Bay Area athlete who has dominated his sport as completely and consistently as jockey Russell Baze. He retired as the world’s winningest rider with 12,842 victories from 53,578 mounts, recording 3,311more victories than Laffit Pincay Jr., the...
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Willie Shoemaker

The Golden Gate Fields Winners Circle is named for Willie Shoemaker, commemorating his first win there at age 18. He became the nation's leading rider for 41 years, from 1949-1990, with 8,833 wins. Shoemaker won every major race in the country, including the Kentucky...
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Johnny “The Pumper” Longden

Johnny Longden rode in and won his first race at Bay Meadows race track in 1935. He was the winner of the first Golden Gate Handicap at Golden Gate Fields in 1947 and won 10 of the first 17 runnings of the Handicap. He won the Triple Crown in 1943 on Count Fleet. In...
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Rick DeMont

During his swimming career in the 1970s, San Rafael-born Rick DeMont established world records in the 1500-meter freestyle, the 400-meter freestyle and the 4x100-meter freestyle relay. He won the 400-meter freestyle in the 1972 Olympics, but his gold medal was taken...
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Summer Sanders

In her two years at Stanford, Summer Sanders won NCAA swimming championships in the six events she entered and was a member of four winning relay teams. She was named Pac-10 Swimmer of the Year in 1991 and ’92. She set two American and three NCAA records and led...
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George Haines

George Haines served as the coach of the United States Olympic swim teams seven times over a 38-year coaching span—1960, '64, '68, '72, '76, '80 and '84. His swimmers won a total of 44 Gold, 14 Silver and 10 Bronze Olympic medals. Fourteen of his swimmers—...
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Mary T. Meagher Plant

Mary Meagher was called "Madam Butterfly" during her spectacular reign in women's swimming at the University of California, Berkeley. At Cal, starting in 1982, she dominated NCAA Championships by winning six titles. A member of three U.S. Olympic Teams, 1980, '84 and...
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Pablo Morales

Pablo Morales won a relay Gold and two Silvers in the 1984 Olympics, but his dream of individual victory drove him to a comeback in 1992 at the advanced swimming age of 27. As captain of the '92 U.S. team, he won that individual Gold in the 100 meter butterfly and...
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Matt Biondi

Matt Biondi’s freestyle swimming brilliance in three Olympics, spaced over eight years (1984-88, 1998-92), brought him and the United States 11 medals: eight gold, two silver, one bronze. The University of California graduate set 12 world records and nine individual...
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John Naber

After starting his swimming career at Woodside High School in Redwood City, Jim Naber attended USC, where he won 25 national AAU titles. At USC, he also set a record by winning 10 individual titles and led his team to four undefeated seasons. At the 1976 Olympic...
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Donna de Varona

At age 13, Donna de Varona, representing the Santa Clara Swim Club, was the youngest member of the 1960 Olympic women’s swim team. She set a world record there in the 400-meter individual medley and won two gold medals at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. That same year, she...
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Don Schollander

A graduate of Santa Clara High School and a member of the 1964 Olympic team, Don Schollander was the first swimmer to win four gold medals. He added a fifth gold medal in the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. Winner of the 100 and 200-meter freestyle, he also swam a leg...
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Mark Spitz

Swimming sensation Mark Spitz, winner of seven gold medals at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, is a graduate of Santa Clara High School and an alumnus of the Santa Clara Swim Club. In 1967, Spitz set a world record in the 100-meter butterfly event. And a year later,...
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Ann Curtis Cuneo

Olympic Gold Medal winner and native San Franciscan Ann Curtis Cuneo was a member of the San Francisco Crystal Plunge team. This extraordinary swimmer was coached by Charlie Sava. Curtis won her Gold Medal during London’s 1948 Olympic Games in the 400-meter freestyle...
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Billie Jean King

Billie Jean King was not only the finest women’s player of her time—the winner of 39 grand slam singles, doubles and mixed doubles—she was also her sport’s inspirational leader off the court. She was the founder of the Women’s Tennis Association, a co-founder of World...
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Dick Gould

In 38 years as Stanford's tennis coach, Dick Gould produced 17 NCAA championship teams, ten singles champions and seven doubles team winners. He was named intercollegiate tennis's Coach of the Decade for both the 1980s and 1990s, with his teams winning three straight...
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John McEnroe

John McEnroe launched his spectacular tennis career at 18 years of age when he reached the semifinals of Wimbledon in 1977. Later that same year, he decided to remain an amateur and attend Stanford University. While at Stanford, he won the 1978 NCAA singles title and...
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Rosie Casals

Rosie Casals developed her tennis skills at San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. At the age of 16, she was ranked top 5 in women's singles for 11 consecutive years. Ranked #1 worldwide in doubles with 12 grand-slam doubles titles, she is a pioneer of women's tennis,...
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Alice Marble

Alice Marble learned tennis at the age of 13 at the San Francisco Golden Gate Park courts. At age 12, she was the official mascot of San Francisco Seals baseball team. She also played basketball and track at San Francisco Polytechnic High School. She was the winner of...
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Helen Hull Jacobs

Tennis great Helen Hull Jacobs, a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley, set a record when she won the United States Singles title four successive years: 1932, 1933, 1934 and 1935. Her rivalry and intensive contests with Helen Wills Moody was the talk...
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J. “Don” Donald Budge

A tennis great, Don Budge was first to win the great slam in 1938 and was both the Wimbledon and U.S. Champion in 1937. The Number one player of the era, he twice won the national amateur tennis title and three times won top professional honors. He was born and raised...
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Helen Wills Roark

University of California, 1922-25 Considered one the best women tennis players of all time, "Little Miss Poker Face" began her remarkable career at the Berkeley Tennis Club. From her initial victories there, Helen Wills Roark moved swiftly to international renown,...
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Jim Hines

Jim Hines is one of the select few men to possess the title of “World’s Fastest Human” and has the sole distinction of being the “first person to break the 10 second barrier”. Hines earned that distinction while representing the United States in the 1968 summer...
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Payton Jordan

Payton Jordan coached track and field at Stanford from 1957 through 1979, his athletes winning six individual NCAA titles and setting five world records. He was the head coach of the 1968 U.S. Olympic team that won a record 24 medals, including 12 Golds, and...
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Tommie Smith

Tommie Smith entered San Jose State on a basketball scholarship but concentrated on track under Coach Bud Winter and became the only man, all time, to hold 11 simultaneous World and Olympic records: 200-meter dash, Olympic and World record, set in Mexico City in 1968,...
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Lee Evans

Lee Evans attended Overfelt High School in San Jose. At San Jose State, he was a member of the school’s NCAA 1969 Championship Team. He set a record for 43.86 for 400 meters in 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City, which stood for 20 years. He won another gold medal for...
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Bruce Jenner

Bruce Jenner lived in San Jose, where he trained at the San Jose Community College Track. In 1975, he established a world record of 8,524 points in an international meet at Oregon University's Hayward Field. He was a gold medal winner in 1976 at Montreal, with a world...
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Cornelius “Dutch” Warmerdam

Dutch Warmerdam began vaulting for the San Francsico Olympic Club in 1939. On April 13, 1940, at the University of California Edwards Field, he became the first man to vault 15 feet using a bamboo pole. He cleared 15 feet 3/4 inches on May 23, 1943, at the Modesto...
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Robert “Bob” Bruce Mathias

Stanford University, 1949-52 On August 6, 1948, 17-year-old Bob Mathias of Tulare High School competed in a grueling 10-event test of heart and muscle to become "the world’s greatest all-around athlete" at the Olympic Games decathlon. Four years later, the stronger...
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Carmen Policy

When Carmen Policy said, “Winning with class,” it was not a slogan. It was a moral imperative. Under his guidance, along with Edward DeBartolo Jr. and Bill Walsh, the San Francisco 49ers became the model of an enlightened, winning sports franchise. Carmen was a sports...
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Anne Warner Cribbs

The bay area has produced many great Olympic athletes, but if they could all appoint an official ambassador to represent them, Anne warner Cribbs would be the runaway choice. She won a gold medal in the 1960 Rome games as a 15 year-old swimmer, sparking a relationship...
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Peter Magowan

No one person has had a greater impact on the San Francisco Giants baseball franchise than Peter Magowan. Peter, a lifelong baseball fan who grew up in New York City, missed his first day of school ever when his father took him to game one of the 1951 world series...
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Franklin Mieuli

Renowned for his deerstalker cap and robust beard, Franklin Mieuli owned the Warriors for more than two decades and in 1975 delivered an NBA Championship to the Bay Area. The colorful Mieuli was already established in the Bay Area sports scene with ownership stakes in...
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Robert (Bob) Lurie

Robert (Bob) Lurie was a real estate magnate and philanthropist, but he is best known in Northern California as the man who saved the Giants baseball team for San Francisco. A long time sportsman who graduated from Northwestern University, he competed in 40 straight...
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Walter A. Haas Jr.

Walter A. Haas Jr. was a noted philanthropist and chairman of Levi Strauss when he bought the Oakland A’s in 1981. Under Haas’s ownership, the A's won three straight American League pennants (1988–90) and one World Series. In 1989, they set what was then a Bay Area...
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Al Davis

As a coach first and then as the managing general partner, Al Davis turned the Oakland Raiders into one of the most successful franchises in professional football. Building on an unwavering philosophy that stressed a strong-armed quarterback, a powerful offensive line...
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Edward (Eddie) DeBartolo, Jr.

Edward DeBartolo, Jr. came to the Bay Area when he purchased the San Francisco 49ers from the Morabito family in 1977. Everything took off in 1979, when Eddie hired Bill Walsh as his coach and brought in great players such as Joe Montana, Jerry Rice, Ronnie Lott, and...
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Lou Spadia

Lou Spadia, a San Francisco native, devoted his life to athletics. He played baseball at Jackson playground in the Potrero District and Mission High. Following Navy duty in WWII, he went to the original Forty Niners in 1946 as office boy, and rose to its president by...
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